Scientific Program

Conference Series Ltd invites all the participants across the globe to attend 14th Food Engineering Conference Melbourne, Australia.

Day 1 :

Keynote Forum

Michele Eskin

University of Manitoba, Canada

Keynote: Emerging green food processing methods: Non-thermal technologies

Time : 10.05-10.40

OMICS International Food Engineering 2016 International Conference Keynote Speaker Michele Eskin photo
Biography:

N A Michael Eskin is Professor of Food Biochemistry in the Department of Human Nutritional Sciences in the Faculty of Agricultural and Food Sciences at the University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Canada. He is the author and co-author of 13 books several of which were translated into Japanese, German and Malay. His book “Biochemistry of Foods”, first published in 1971 by Academic Press, New York has become a classic in the field with the third edition released in 2013 and the Portuguese edition released in 2015. His research work includes original work that was crucial for establishing the properties and performance of canola oil that helped to successfully launch it worldwide. He has also done extensive research on yellow mustard mucilageN A Michael Eskin is Professor of Food Biochemistry in the Department of Human Nutritional Sciences in the Faculty of Agricultural and Food Sciences at the University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Canada. He is the author and co-author of 13 books several of which were translated into Japanese, German and Malay. His book “Biochemistry of Foods”, first published in 1971 by Academic Press, New York has become a classic in the field with the third edition released in 2013 and the Portuguese edition released in 2015. His research work includes original work that was crucial for establishing the properties and performance of canola oil that helped to successfully launch it worldwide. He has also done extensive research on yellow mustard mucilage

Abstract:

This paper will review the potential of nonthermal methods (pulsed electric field, high pressure processing, high intensity pulsed light, ozonization, ultrasound, cold plasma processing, ultraviolet and ionizing radiation) as safe and alternative green food processing strategies. The development of green processing technologies is a priority for industry in order to minimize the use of organic solvents as well as provide more energy efficient and economical methods. Examples of the advantages of some of these technologies will be presented including recent work in my laboratory using ultrasound for removing chlorophyll from hemp oil.

Break: Refreshment Break, 10:40-10:[email protected]

Keynote Forum

Marek Sikora

University of Agriculture at Krakowie, Poland

Keynote: Polysaccharide hydrocolloids as the stabilizers of starch pastes and gels

Time : 10.55-11.30

OMICS International Food Engineering 2016 International Conference Keynote Speaker Marek Sikora photo
Biography:

 

      Dr. Marek Sikora is working as a researcher at Uniwersytet Rolniczy w Krakowie, Poland.  He has extended his valuable service for many years and has been a recipient of many award and grants. His experience includes various programs, contributions and participation in different events for diverse fields of study. His research interests reflect in his wide range of publications in various national and international journals. 

 

 

Abstract:

Non-starchy polysaccharide hydrocolloids (NPH), such as xanthan, guar and locust bean gums were tested as the stabilizers of the normal (NPS) and waxy (WPS) potato pastes and gels. NPS and WPS pastes without and with an addition of NPH were studied in terms of the flow curves and hysteresis loops areas, and the thixotropic properties were determined by the in-shear structural recovery as well as by apparent viscosity at constant shear of 50 s-1 (with and without pre-shearing) tests. Susceptibility to retrogradation of two NPS (with various amylose content) and WPS upon an addition of NPH were also studied. For this purpose the viscoelastic and textural properties as well as syneresis of the chilled samples, stored up to 90 days were measured. It was stated that both the rheological and storage stability of the samples depended on the starch properties (amylose content and concentration) as well as on the quality and amount of NPH added. In order to keep the rheological stability, an important factor was the temperature of the samples’ preparation; while in order to keep the storage stability, the time of storage was the main factor.

 

  • Special Session
Location: Q1

Session Introduction

Dan Yang Ying

CSIRO Agriculture and Foods, Australia

Title: Engineering Solutions to Food Security Through Waste to Food Transformation

Time : 11.30-12.30

Speaker
Biography:

Danyang Ying is working as Senior Research Scientist/Project Leader at CSIRO Agriculture & amp; Food, Australia. He has extended his valuable service for many years and has been a recipient of many award and grants. His experience includes various programs, contributions and participation in different events for diverse fields of study. His research interests reflect in his wide range of publications in various national and international journals.

Abstract:

To feed the world in 2050 we need to increase total global food production by 70%. This will become increasingly challenging with a changing climate and limited arable land. By 2030, crop and pasture yield are likely to decline in many places. On the other hand, global food loss and food waste is high, estimated up to 30% of the food production. Transforming the waste to food could be one of the strategies to ease the pressure to food security. This presentation will report recent development and strategies to transform agricultural, horticultural and food industry waste into edible foods or food ingredients using a few case studies, including improving canola protein digestibility using extrusion; Stabilization of apple pomace for functional food ingredients and incorporation into extruded food products; incorporation of olive pomace into extruded food products. 

  • Food Engineering | Food Processsing | Food Microbiology | Food Safety Hazards & Control | Food Biochemistry
Location: Q1
Speaker

Chair

Michele Eskin

University of Manitoba, Canada

Speaker

Co-Chair

Ajay Shah

AAS Food Technology Pty Ltd., Australia

Session Introduction

Kerri Choo

Curtin University of Technology, Australia

Title: The role of enzymes in value adding to seafood processing waste

Time : 12.30-13.00

Speaker
Biography:

Kerri Choo has completed a Bachelor of Science with Honors in Food Science and Technology at Curtin University. She has experience working within the food manufacturing industry in quality assurance and research and development. Over the last 4 years she has specialized in post-harvest research in the seafood industry including export supply chain monitoring and product development. She currently works as a Research Officer at the Seafood Post Harvest Research Program at Curtin University collaborating with industry to develop value added products from seafood waste. 

Abstract:

Discarded processing waste generated by the seafood industry in Australia has financial and environmental repercussions. Seafood waste is a valuable source of protein, fats and minerals that can be recovered for use in food and other industrial applications. In Australia, only a small percentage is currently utilized with the remaining disposed in landfill, at a cost to processors. By adding proteolytic enzymes to the seafood waste at optimal conditions, it is transformed into a protein hydrolysate. Higher value products can be derived from seafood hydrolysates with further processing and extraction methods, including functional ingredients, flavorings, fertilizers and aquaculture feed additives. Hydrolysates produced using enzymes have shown to produce a higher quality product than the more traditional acid hydrolysis. The enzymes operate in milder conditions and significantly reduce reaction time; therefore decreasing production time and costs. It has also shown to increase product yield, improve the amino acid profile and reduce oxidation. The application of enzyme technology to process seafood waste provides new opportunities for seafood processors and other businesses to develop valuable products and minimize waste. This presentation will discuss several case studies on the commercial feasibility of using protease enzymes to transform existing seafood processing waste into high valuable products and the future opportunities arising from this research. 

Break: Lunch Break, 13:00-14:[email protected]

Andualem Sisay

Nation Media Group, Africa Renewal, New Business Ethiopia

Title: The Food Security Paradox in 21st Century Ethiopia

Time : 14.00-14.30

Speaker
Biography:

Andualem Sisay Gessesse is an Ethiopian journalist with over a decade of experience in media and communications consultancy. The local and international publications he worked with and is still working for include: Capital newspaper of Ethiopia, The East African newspaper, www.Africareview.com, Daily Nation of Kenya, The Citizen of Tanzania, Daily Monitor of Uganda, www.newBusinessEthiopia.com, Africa Renewal of the United Nations, among others. In 2011, Andualem has won Journalist of the year Award by Ethiopian Foreign Correspondent Association in English language category. Andualem has also worked for international organizations such as, UNFPA Ethiopia office (United Nations Population Fund), Global Integrity, World Wide Web Foundation, Devex, Kifiya Financial Technology, Techno Brain Ethiopia and Starbucks and Microsoft East and South Africa wing through the PR firm - Bertolli & Associates of Kenya.

Abstract:

The second most populous nation in Africa after Nigeria with a population close to 100 million, Ethiopia is a predominantly agrarian nation which ironically remains one of the most food-insecure. Around 80% of Ethiopia’s population lives in rural parts of the country, hence dependent on agriculture. However, the country has not been able to feed itself and is often dependent on foreign food aid to feed millions of its population. In an attempt to overcome this chronic food self-insufficiency, the government recently has introduced an institution–Ethiopian Agricultural Transformation (ATA). ATA, which is being mainly financed by Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, has been working with other global partners to boost the productivity of Ethiopian agriculture through the introduction of various technologies. Following the establishment of ATA, the country has also ratified a law that allows the use of genetically modified foods (GMOs). In addition, Ethiopia has also become among the priority countries of President Obama’s ‘Feed the Future’ program. This paper looks into the history of agriculture and food insecurity, previous attempts to trigger agri-revolution, the recently introduced law and subsequent undertakings and activities on the ground, achievements and challenges in relation to introduction of engineered seeds to Ethiopia and its journey towards food security. 

L. Giurgiulescu

L Mihaly Cozmuta and Bianca Valean Technical University of Cluj-Napoca, Romania

Title: Analysis of heavy metal concentration in some romanian white wines
Speaker
Biography:

L Giurgiulescu is working as Editor-in-Chief for Carpathian journal of food science and technology. Her experience includes various programs, contributions and participation in different countries for diverse fields of study. Her research interests reflect in her wide range of publications in various national and international journals. 

 

 

Abstract:

The research analyses heavy metals content in 9 white wines from different region of Romania. Wines were analyzed for Cu, Fe, Cd, Mg, Ca, Na, K, Ni Zn and Co using atomic absorption spectrophotometer Perkin-Elmer Analysis 800. K, Na, Mg and Ca present high concentration in white wines. Fe, Cu, Ni, Zn and Cd were in normal limit. Co was under the detection limit. Non-essential Co concentration was very low in white wines. Comparison with literature shows all heavy metal concentrations in the analyzed Romanian white wines to be below the limits designated by EFSA and Romanian Health Ministry.

 

  • Workshop
Location: Q1

Session Introduction

Ajay Shah

AAS Food Technology PTY Ltd., Australia

Title: High pressure processing: new opportunities for clean label processing

Time : 15.00-16.00

Speaker
Biography:

Ajay Shah is working as Director of AAS Food Technology PTY Ltd., Australia. He has extended his valuable service for many years and has been a recipient of many award and grants. His experience includes various programs, contributions and participation in different events for diverse fields of study. His research interests reflect in his wide range of publications in various national and international journals. 

Abstract:

There has been a growing demand by modern day consumers for fresher, healthier, less processed foods which are packaged for convenience with extended shelf life. One of the most successful developments to date by the food industry is high pressure processing (HPP). Pressures ranging between 100 and 1200 MPa have been considered as effective to inactivate spoilage and pathogenic microorganisms without the use of additives. HPP also provides good control of enzymatic browning in fruit and vegetable products including purees and juices. HPP causes minimal change to the food, thereby preserving nutrients and providing a taste, texture and appearance comparable to unprocessed product. HPP is a powerful tool to develop high quality purees, ready to eat meals and baby food with better nutritional and sensory qualities including texture. HPP will also assist in developing novel dairy products with increased shelf life.

Break: Networking & Refreshment Break, 16:00-16:[email protected]
  • Young Researchers Forum
Location: Q1
Speaker

Chair

Michele Eskin

University of Manitoba, Canada

Speaker

Co-Chair

Ajay Shah

AAS Food Technology Pty Ltd., Australia

Session Introduction

Mina Tirgar

University of Otago, New Zealand

Title: Flaxseed Protein Concentrates as Emulsifiers for Potential Plant-Based Food Fortification

Time : 16.15-16.35

Speaker
Biography:

Mina Tirgar is currently a PhD student at University of Otago, New Zealand. She has completed a Bachelor’s degree in Food Science and Technology at Azad University, Science and Research Branch, Tehran. She continued her studies in Malaysia where she completed a Master’s degree in Food Science and Technology at University Putra Malaysia.

 

Abstract:

Emulsions are common forms of food products comprising of small oil droplets distributed in an aqueous phase. Emulsions are susceptible to destabilization through physicochemical phenomena. The most common way to improve the stability of emulsions is to add emulsifiers such as proteins and polysaccharides to prevent droplets accumulation by producing repulsive forces between droplets. Consumer interest is currently growing in plant-based protein emulsifiers due to reduced environmental impact and perceived nutritional benefits. Flaxseed meal is a good source of high quality protein (20–35%), but more knowledge is required on its extraction and functionality of the resulting protein concentrates. Flaxseed protein concentrates (FPCs) containing different levels of mucilage were prepared using (1) alkali extraction by isoelectric precipitation (A-FPC), (2) enzymatic extraction by hydrolysis of fibre (E-FPC) and (3) solvent extraction (ES-FPC) using ethanol (95%). The emulsifying properties of the 3 FPCs were compared in terms of protein solubility (PS), viscosity, oil droplet size, polydispersity (PDI), water holding capacity (WHC) and oil holding capacity (OHC). ES-FPC and A-FPC had the highest and lowest protein content respectively. All emulsions showed mono-modal droplet distribution with small particle size (≤0.45 µm). The highest (94.8%) and lowest (75.2%) solubility was recorded for E-FPC and ES-FPC, respectively. A-FPC showed the highest viscosity, water and oil-holding capacity. Overall, this study indicated that the flaxseed protein with a suitable amount of mucilage can meet the current consumer demand for plant-based protein and fibre in food emulsion systems. 

Speaker
Biography:

L Bidyalakshmi has completed her MSc in Applied Nutrition from Dr. N.T.R. University of Health Science in the year 2013. At present, she is pursuing her PhD from National Institute of Nutrition, ICMR in the Food Chemistry Division under Dr. R. Ananthan. Her work is based on the indigenous food system of the Meitei community of Manipur and its nutritional implications.

Abstract:

Underutilized foods have major contribution in the food security, nutrition, health, economic and environmental services. Fruits of Rhus semialata are underutilized foods which are grown and consumed in north eastern India. It has great application in the traditional medicine to cure various ailments. The study was carried out to determine the proximate composition, mineral content, vitamins, amino acids, fatty acids, antioxidant activity and total polyphenol content in the fruit. R. semialata fruit found to have 8.13% protein, 16.70% fat, 2.86% ash, 44.91% total dietary fibre, 24.62% carbohydrate. Minerals such as Fe, Ca, Zn, Mg, Mn, Cu and P were 1.45, 183, 1.45, 89.32, 0.65, 0.51 and 276 mg/100 g respectively. Vitamin content of R. semialata was 13.58 mg of ascorbic acid, 0.16 mg of B6, 0.161 mg of B5 and 0.628 mg of carotenoids in 100 g of edible portion. Sulphur containing amino acids were found to be limiting amino acids with a score of 65. Linoleic acid was the major fatty acid (48%) with total saturated fatty acids of 35.9% and total unsaturated fatty acid of 64.1%. IC 50 values of R. semialata fruit showed 7.5 mg/ml in DPPH assay, 1226 mmol in FRAP assay, 229 µmol ascorbic acid equivalent for water soluble extracts and 100 µmol trolox equivalent for lipid soluble extract in superoxide anion radicle scavenging assay with a total polyphenol content of 3.1 g GAE. Considering the presence of both primary and secondary metabolites, R. semialata could be a potential underutilized food source in terms of nutrients and phytonutrient application.

 

Speaker
Biography:

Fuhua Li is studying for a PhD at School of Food Science and Engineering at South China University of Technology. Her main areas of research is into naturally bioactive compounds, particularly for plant polyphenols. In detail, the composition and antioxidant activity of polyphenols, the effect of processing technology on polyphenols profile. Her research results were  mainly published in reputed journals, such as Food and Bioprocess Techology and Journal of Functional Foods, etc. 

Abstract:

The effect of clarification by 100 and 18kDa molar weight cut-off (MWCO) ultrafiltration membranes, as well as the storage period (1-2 months) on polyphenol profile, bioactivities (α-Glucosidase inhibition and antioxidant activities) and color properties of mulberry juice (MJ) were investigated. Results indicated that ultrafiltration processing (100kDa MWCO) enriched the phenolic compounds. Comparing to the crude, the clarified MJ showed improved color, α-Glucosidase inhibition activity (αIA) and antioxidant property. However, the excessive clarification by 18kDa MWCO membrane presented more losses of MJ polyphenols due to membrane fouling. At the end of the first one month, the crude MJ showed obvious instability in both the polyphenol content and their bioactivities, which were well retained or even enhanced in the filtered juice by 100kDa MWCO membrane. At the end of storage of two months, compared to MJ stored for one month, the clarified MJ showed significant improvement in contents of phenolic acids and flavonoids, as well as the bioactivities. Accordingly, ultrafiltration processing especially for 100kDa membrane favored the preservation of MJ polyphenols and their bioactivities.

Speaker
Biography:

Divya Eratte is working as Faculty of Science and Technology, Federation University Australia, Ballarat, VIC 3353, Australia.Her experience includes various programs, contributions and participation in different countries for diverse fields of study. Her research interests reflect in her wide range of publications in various national and international journals.

 

 

Abstract:

Co-microencapsulated omega-3 rich tuna oil (O) and probiotic bacteria L. casei (P) powder was produced using whey protein isolate (WPI)–gum Arabic (GA) complex coacervate wall matrix system. The release behavior of co-microencapsulated omega-3 oil and viability of co-microencapsulated probiotic bacteria were carried out to understand its applicability as a controlled release delivery system. The in vitro digestibility of co-microcapsules (WPI-P-O-GA) and microcapsules (WPI-P-GA and WPI-O-GA) on sequential exposure to simulated salivary fluid (SSF), simulated gastric fluid (SGF) and simulated intestinal fluid (SIF) were examined. Co-microencapsulation increased the survivability of L. casei during simulated digestion. Surface hydrophobicity of co-microencapsulated L. casei was greater than that of microencapsulated L. casei indicating greater intestinal adhesionHowever, there was no significant difference in the assimilative reductions of cholesterol by microencapsulated and co-microencapsulated L. casei. There was no significant influence observed on the release properties of omega-3 oil due to co-microencapsulation. However, the total omega-3 fatty acids in the released oil during in vitro digestion were found to be higher, when co-microencapsulated. Hence, the co-microencapsulation could protect the L. casei in delivering the viable cells and omega-3 oil to human intestine without any significant adverse effect on their functionalities and properties. 

Speaker
Biography:

Bridgette Naa Deedei Tagoe is currently MPhil student at the Crop Science Department of the School of Agriculture, at the University of Ghana, Legon. She holds a BSc degree in Agriculture from the University Cape Coast and a Diploma in Post-harvest Technology also from the University of Ghana. She is also a trained Teacher by profession.

Abstract:

In recent times, maize has become first among other grains and cereals in terms of annual area planted in Ghana. Unfortunately, the crop suffers several losses, such as aflatoxin contamination along the maize post-harvest value chain which affects both quality and quantity before reaching the final consumer. A study was carried out to assess the qualitative and quantitative losses of maize along the maize value chain in two regions, Brong-Ahafo and Eastern Regions of Ghana. Questionnaires administered to key informant of the value chain established the main causative factors of post-harvest losses; such as losses due to the effects of insects, rodents, monkeys, birds, bushfires, ruminants (sheep and goats) and rainfall causing grains to grow mould since most farmers allowed drying on stalk before harvesting. Results from questionnaires, focus group discussion, transect walk and biophysical measurements indicated significant difference between the two regions: Mold (P-0.007), insect pest (P-0.005) and other pest (P-0.005). Laboratory analyses also showed the presence of free fatty acids and high levels of aflatoxins in most maize sampled, indicating poor storage. Change in moisture content reduced the volume and weight of the grains and was perceived as source of losses, hence the need for maize variety with less moisture content. The study revealed that even though responses from these value chain actors indicated that with the help of the extension workers they are abreast with several technologies to prevent losses, most value actors are not implementing what they learnt. There is therefore the need to use more innovative approach to help value chain actors in the maize industry to adopt methods for reducing post-harvest losses in the sector. The rapid loss assessment tool was observed to be an effective tool for assessing loss from the flow of the product.